Jonathan Fecowicz

Finance, Tech, and General Musings

"One of the things that was great for David Byrne when we did Stop Making Sense was that David really got to design the lighting for the show—and by extension for the movie. He hadn’t got to do everything he wanted to do lighting wise with the stage show because of the limitations of technology at that point. But David got a chance to work with Jordan Cronenweth who shot Blade Runner and was a great master of American cinematography, and he could do all the little tweakings and brushstrokes that he had dreamed of doing with the stage show. […] It’s great working with [Cronenweth] because he’s an absolute tight-ass perfectionist. You can’t get Jordan to back away from anything he’s doing until he’s got it perfect, and that can be exasperating because you’ve got one eye on the clock and you’re desperate to get moving. But then when you see the dailies and you see the extra level Jordan was taking it to when he was driving you nuts, you go, ‘Thank God he did it.’ He’s a painstaking artist.”

"I’d just as soon it didn’t occur to people that they’re watching a concert, but rather a band performing without the distancing factor of it being an event that happened once. That’s why there’s no audience in the film until the very end. I thought it was important if the film was to be as effective for filmgoers as it was for me watching the concert. I wanted to capture the energy and the flow and that unrelenting progression of music."

"We were minutely prepared. David had storyboarded the concert in a series of close shots. Not for the film, but for a tour. From this storyboard, I started to develop a model of the film, which by the way never stopped being modified. I worked closely with my visual advisor Sandy McLeod, who made sure I was in constant contact with the Talking Heads while they were on tour. I traveled with them myself for one week in Texas, then, before our concert, I followed all their performances on the West Coast. So on D-Day, I had a precise idea about the best camera placements. Having said that, 50 percent of the shots were conceived on the spot. […] This was the first multiple-camera situation I’d ever been in. The first night was pretty disastrous. Suddenly it was all happening, and all the preparation and planning was put up against the reality of the show. Cameras ran out of film, the band was real nervous and uptight having cameras stuck in their faces. We kept getting each other in the background of shots too much. It was a mess, but a superb camera rehearsal. The next three nights were spectacular." — Jonathan Demme on Stop Making Sense

One of the greatest concert films ever

(Source: strangewood)

fastcodesign:

The Tour De France As A Tube Map
First designed in 1931, Harry Beck's Tube Map of the London Underground might be the most iconic transit map in the world. But can a design language used to make sense of the 249 miles of underground tunnels be successfully applied to the Tour de France, the biggest bicycle race in the world, with a length of track 10 times longer?
Read More>

Want this

fastcodesign:

The Tour De France As A Tube Map

First designed in 1931, Harry Beck's Tube Map of the London Underground might be the most iconic transit map in the world. But can a design language used to make sense of the 249 miles of underground tunnels be successfully applied to the Tour de France, the biggest bicycle race in the world, with a length of track 10 times longer?

Read More>

Want this

(via fastcompany)

newyorker:

Hilton Als on Paul Zone’s book of rock photography: http://nyr.kr/1oeCAjo

“His subjects are all so young and trying not to show it; the poses they strike speak of their relative innocence and glory, and their fearlessness, too.”

Above: Debbie Harry (Blondie), Arturo Vega’s loft, 1975.

newyorker:

Hilton Als on Paul Zone’s book of rock photography: http://nyr.kr/1oeCAjo

“His subjects are all so young and trying not to show it; the poses they strike speak of their relative innocence and glory, and their fearlessness, too.”

Above: Debbie Harry (Blondie), Arturo Vega’s loft, 1975.

(Source: newyorker.com)

Stars and Stripes
jamesnord:

Thanks for the show America. 

Stars and Stripes

jamesnord:

Thanks for the show America. 

fastcompany:

This Architect Is Wearing His Wi-Fi Signal

There are invisible energy fields all around us. Now, one architect has invented a tool to introduce some of them to the spectrum of visible light. Luis Hernan’s self-portraits show the artist and Newcastle University researcher dancing in a cloud of colorful Wi-Fi signals.

Read More>

iOS 8 WebKit Finally Gets Safari-Level Performance

parislemon:

On the topic of huge iOS changes, here’s Mike Beasley:

When iOS 7 launched, developers discovered that their apps with built-in web browsers were unable to achieve the same level of JavaScript performance as the stock Safari app. This was because Apple restricted use of its improved Nitro JavaScript engine to its own app, leaving third-parties with a slower version.

As of iOS 8, however, it seems that decision has been reversed. All apps will now be able to use the same improved JavaScript engine that powers Safari. That means Google’s Chrome browser on iOS will now be just as quick as Safari, as will the pop-up browsers embedded in apps like Twitter and Facebook.

Unclear why this wasn’t always the case. But glad that it appears to now be the case. Next up: wondering if the rendering engine restriction will ever change…

I always wondered why that was the case